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Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners, oh my!

1940s Cream Leighton Pottery EPNS Rimmed Square Bowl Planter Pattern 6470

Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners, oh my!

Something a little different for readers today, a delightful guest blog from my good friend and U.S.A Ruby Lane shop owner, Pam. I was asking a question in the Vintage and Antiques Google Plus community about how to describe a vintage planter, (the one in the main image), which led Pam to write the following post. 

Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners, oh my! Are there differences in these beautiful bowls, yes but these days the names have become interchangeable.

A completely intact Ferner will have the metal insert, which, due to the passing of time, most do not. The insert is not just over the lip of the bowl but an actual bowl within the bowl. CF Monroe made quite a few of these during the late 1800’s and into the early 1900’s. You will see quite a few of the Wavecrest pattern, most without the insert.

Once the insert is gone, does the piece become a jardiniere, cachepot or just a planter. Technically, just a planter…here’s the breakdown.

Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners
Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners, oh my!

A Cachepot is a decorative planter meant to be used tabletop and so usually a bit smaller than a jardiniere. A cachepot is meant to hide the less ornamental plant pot within it’s decorative bowl. Can you still use a cachepot for planting flowers, yes but I would add some kind of liner, to absorb excess water…a few stones, a little peat at the bottom, etc.

A Jardiniere is larger and also decorative. Jardiniere’s, despite their size, will usually be footed and while some are not too big to use tabletop…it would need to be a pretty big table:) Jardinieres also come in the form of outdoor planters…think concrete or even metal stands. So a Jardiniere can be used either to hide a pot or to put the plant in directly, depending on the design.

Basically, they’re all planters and in going through listings, I’m not sure many know the difference, or care to, but if your piece dates to the early part of the 20th century or earlier, it is important to know at least original meaning of these names.

When listing them, I would use the original name along with Planter.

Let’s go with some examples…

A footed Jardiniere

Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners
Footed Jardiniere

 

A Tole Jardiniere

Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners
A Tole Jardiniere

 

A Jardiniere, Plant Stand Style

Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners
A Jardiniere, Plant Stand Style

 

A Cachepot from Dark Flowers Antiques on Ruby Lane

Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners
A Cachepot from Dark Flowers Antiques on Ruby Lane

Cachepots can also be footed but in more of a decorative way, than true Jardinieres.

A rare Ferner with Insert from Shar’n Antiques on Ruby Lane

Cachepots, Jardinieres, Planters and Ferners
Milk Glass Ferner with Insert from Shar’n Antiques on Ruby Lane

You will notice that each of these terms comes up with almost every listing, as I mentioned being used interchangeably but at one point they each served a specific purpose. Terminology may be partially geographical.  If one antique shop calls something a ferner and not a cachepot, the entire town calls it that, and on it spreads through a region.

I hope you found the post informative and now know the differences between these versatile and useful pots! Thank you to Pam for sharing this with us!

Visit Pam’s shop, Whimsical Vintage, on Ruby Lane by clicking on the following link. She sells a range of delightful vintage items, and is an expert on U.S.A costume jewellery/ jewelry!

For more Vintage related blogs, please click on the following link.

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