Posted on

X-RAY SPECS: A Guest Blog By Young Man Gone West

X-Ray Specs

X-RAY SPECS: A Guest Blog By Young Man Gone West

Richard, blogger extraordinaire, going by the pseudonym ‘Young Man Gone West,’ (YMGW), has kindly allowed me to post his wonderful blog ‘X-Ray Specs’ for our Mullard Antiques readers.

Some of you may recognise this Halsey USAAF X-Ray Warning Light from our website. YMGW purchased the light and has ensured that it is now in full working condition. The blog explains more about its fascinating history with some great accompanying images! 

I think we can all say that YMGW has done a good job on the post and the light. Wonderful to see the lamp in working condition. A real vintage statement piece!

X-Ray Specs

Likely manufactured in the late-1960s but updated in the mid-1980s – the Freed transformer inside is dated August 1969, but the Soderberg anti-collision beacon October 1985 – this Halsey industrial X-ray warning device was used by the United States military. The item bears an affixed metal plate, plus a sticker from the time of its disposal, that together provide valuable information on its origins.

Xray Specs
Halsey Industrial X-ray Warning Device

The Disposal Turn-In Document (DTID) number acts as a unique disposal serial number. The first six places provide the Address Activity Code. FB5587 is RAF Lakenheath. The light was, thus, used by the USAAF. The next four places indicate the date the item was catalogued for disposal. Per the US military’s adaptation of the Julian dating system, 9196 is 6 April 1991.

Xray Specs
Disposal Sticker

The National Stock Number (NSN) system was standardised by NATO in 1974 to track military assets, although versions of it existed prior. The first four places indicate the Federal Supply Classification Group. FSCG 9905 is for signs, advertising displays and identification plates: even military ID plates have their own ID codes! 00 in the fifth and sixth places indicates the United States.

Xray Specs

Demilitarisation Codes indicate the degree of physical destruction required. DEMIL: A denotes a non-munitions/non-strategic item that does not demand any such. $2,245.63 is understood to be the asking price at disposal in 1991, over £3,000 at 2017 prices. The Federal Condition Code is given as A1 – serviceable without qualification, new/unused.

Xray Specs

Halsey was a trademark of Post Glover Medical Products, of Erlanger, Kentucky. Established in 1938, the company supplied medical items, including X-ray illumination boxes. It still trades, as PG LifeLink. The light would have been supplied via the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center, Georgia, part of the USAAF’s Materiel Command.

Xray Specs
X-ray lamp repaired and illuminated!

Shaped like a truncated pyramid, the device stands 29 inches tall. When switched on the Lucite panels are illuminated from within, and the twin bulbs in the beacon rotate within the red glass housing. Built to operate on US 115v mains, the light has been converted to run on UK 240v, with a new transformer inserted to provide steeped-down voltage for the 28v DC beacon. The original transformer and Hubbell connectors have been left in place, to enable any future reinstatement to the original set-up.

(Many thanks to Steve and Karen, of Mullard Magic, for assistance with the item’s history; and to various members of the UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Forum for advice and parts.)

Post written by Richard: Young Man Gone West (YMGW)

Thank you to you YMGW too! And for all Mullard Antiques blog readers, please click on the following link to YMGW’s website for more fascinating posts.

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Posted on

Latest Royal Mail Posting Dates for Christmas 2017

Latest Royal Mail Posting Dates for Christmas 2017

Latest Royal Mail Posting Dates for Christmas 2017!

Hi everyone!

I hope you are all keeping well?

I can’t believe how this year has flown by! Halloween and Bonfire Night have been and gone so here in the UK the next big holiday is Christmas! I know this isn’t quite the case everywhere in the World but my apologies for not listing all your special celebrations and holidays here, but I hope you all enjoy them anyway!

Since some of you are usually very well (or is it ill?) prepared for the vagaries of the postal system around the festive season, I thought I would share with you the latest Royal Mail Posting Dates For Christmas.

I have only shared with you the dates for the Royal Mail (under 2Kg weight category) International Tracked/ Signed, (as here at Mullard Antiques we don’t ship Internationally via surface mail), and UK Inland Services.

Items weighing over 2Kg, or of a larger dimension, are normally shipped via a courier. It is best to contact us prior to purchase, as the delivery times vary depending on the courier used.

Having shared this with you, I would add that some items will take longer to ship than indicated, as things can get held up in customs.

I’ll be in touch again soon!

Karen

Mullard Antiques and Collectibles

For more information on Latest Posting Dates For Christmas 2017, click on the following link http://www.royalmail.com/greetings

International Standard (formerly Airmail) and all International Tracking and Signature Services (formerly Airsure® and International Signed For®)

Saturday 2 December: Africa, Middle East
Wednesday 6 December: Cyprus, Asia, Far East (including Japan), Eastern Europe (except Poland, Czech Republic and Slovakia)
Thursday 7 December: Caribbean, Central & South America
Saturday 9 December: Greece, Australia, New Zealand
Wednesday 13 December: Czech Republic, Germany, Italy, Poland
Thursday 14 December: Canada, Finland, Sweden, USA
Friday 15 December: Austria, Denmark, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Switzerland
Saturday 16 December: Belgium, France, Ireland, Luxembourg

UK Inland Services
Wednesday 20 December: 2nd Class and Royal Mail Signed For®
Thursday 21 December: 1st Class and Royal Mail Signed For®
Thursday 21 December: Royal Mail Special Delivery Guaranteed®
Friday 22 December: Special Delivery Saturday Guaranteed

Posted on

The Wondrous World Of Carlton Ware

Carlton Ware Buttercup Toast Rack Salad Ware

The Wondrous World Of Carlton Ware

I think we have established by now that I have an intrinsic love of pottery and, in particular, Staffordshire pottery. There are just so many potteries to choose from, you really do have to narrow down your collecting options!

Today, I thought that I must give Carlton Ware a mention. A Stoke-on-Trent pottery company that operated for more than a 100 years.

Over the decades, Carlton have produced 1000s of designs and models. Many of the model numbers are well documented but there are also quite a few that are missing. The Australian registered design/ pattern reference, sometimes seen as a back mark, was used to prevent copying particularly in Australia and New Zealand!

Wiltshaw And Robinson

The company was established in 1890 by James Frederick Wiltshaw, William Herbert Robinson and James Alcock Robinson. They traded as Wiltshaw and Robinson. In 1894, they trademarked the name Carlton Ware and renamed their factory ‘Carlton Works’. The recognisable Carlton Ware ‘script back mark’ was not introduced until 1928.

 

Carlton ware Australian
Carlton Ware script backmark

Carlton are probably most famous for their tableware embellished with highly decorated leaves, flowers, fruit and birds. In fact, they produced an eclectic range of pottery ephemera. Some of which is now highly collectible and increasing significantly in value, for example their Persian, Chinese and Japanese inspired shapes and designs.

1920s Carlton Ware Persian pattern No. 2882: back stamped W&R, Stoke-on-Trent

 

Over the following years, the design and style of Carlton products varied with the arrival of different designers, heralding several eras of change at the factory. One such designer was the extremely innovative Harold Wain. He brought in the, now highly desirable, Tutankhamun inspired ceramics, following discovery of the tomb by the Egyptologist, Howard Carter, in 1922.

Carlton Ware
Tutankhamun Carlton Ware

 

The Art Deco Period

The company produced hand-painted domestic pottery in high art deco styles during the 1920s and 1930s. Many of the beautiful embossed patterns are now highly recognisable, including the ‘Salad ware’ range.

 

Carlton Ware Buttercup Toast Rack Salad Ware
Carlton Ware Buttercup Toast Rack Salad Ware

Carlton also produced many types of small collectible figurines including fairies, novelty and comic characters. High lustre was introduced in 1949.

This small Art Deco Carlton Ware Rock Garden two handled ribbed Jug/ Vase was made in the 1930s and and is typical of the period. It has a pale green background with embossed spring flowers in an array of vibrant colours. The pattern is 1244 “Rock Garden, ” but this is also known as Garden Wall.

Carlton Ware Rock Garden
Carlton Ware Rock Garden

 

During this period that Carlton also produced advertising ware, including the ceramic ‘Guinness’ toucans as promotional items for Guinness.

Carlton Ware
Carlton Guinness Toucan Advertising Ware

 

The Mid- 20th Century

After WW2, Carlton again changed style and moved towards more Scandinavian type designs in the 1950s and 60s.

In 1966, the company was taken over by Arthur Wood & Sons and the company moved into less expensive lines of production. Wood also introduced a wider range of back marks. Gone were the Hand painted ‘Best ware’ styles of the early 20th Century but the 1970s did bring the ‘Walking Ware’ era: those cups with feet!

Unfortunately, a mismanaged change of ownership led to the closure of the Stoke factory in 1989. There have been several attempts at revival; some with a modicum of success too!

I hope you enjoyed my short overview of Carlton Ware. There are many different styles and designs from this pottery to suit all tastes and pockets of would-be collectors. In addition, there are some really good resources available, providing a wealth of information, including the Carlton Ware World website. 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Posted on

A Short Overview Of SylvaC Pottery

SylvaC Pottery

A Short Overview Of SylvaC Pottery

For those of you whom are regular readers of my blog, you are probably now all aware of the fact that I love pottery! Over the years I have acquired many pieces from vases to ornaments, to whole tea and dinner services. I don’t just collect one manufacturer or style; it tends to be a mixture of things that appeal at the time of purchase. Some things were given as gifts by now, sadly, deceased relatives and these items have sentimental value; a contact with the past and a loving memory. Others appeal because of their colour or style.

One of the pottery manufacturers which I do admire is SylvaC Pottery, and I have collected several pieces over the years. One or two pieces I will never part with just because I love them so much! It’s not that they are all worth a small fortune; SylvaC is increasing in value but you can still pick up the more common models for below £20. It’s just that they are unusual but still immediately identifiable as SylvaC.

SylvaC Pottery:

The company, Shaw and Copestake (SylvaC) was founded in 1894 by William Copestake and William Shaw, in Longton, Stoke-On-Trent, Staffordshire. Copestake left in 1895 and Richard Hull became Shaw’s partner, and was joined by Hull’s son (Richard Junior) in 1936.

The trade name SylvaC wasnt registered until 1937. Pieces prior to this date were not marked SylvaC. Some were marked ‘Silvo.’

In 1938, the partners bought Thomas Lawrence Falcon pottery.  The name ‘Falcon ware’ was used for pieces produced at both the Falcon and Sylvan (SylvaC) works until 1964. SylvaC continued to thrive as Shaw and Copestake until 1982 when it went into voluntary liquidation.

SylvaC are famous for their figurines of animals; in particular rabbits and dogs, but they also produced a wide range of novelty and character wares too.

Animals

Imps/ Gnomes/ Pixies

Most of us remember SylvaC in the orange and green matt glazes but they actually used quite a range of colours. Gloss glaze was introduced in 1970.

SylvaC Ware Model 5282 White Heraldic Brass Rubbing Tankard
SylvaC Ware Model 5282 White Heraldic Brass Rubbing Tankard

 

They were also well know for their  Dinnerware e.g. pots in the shape of vegetables with faces, and Toby/ Character Jugs, which were popular commemorative and advertising pieces.

SylvaC pottery
SylvaC model 4553 Beetroot Happy Face Pot

Backmark

During the 1920s/ 30s, SylvaC used a daisy wheel logo without the brand name ‘SylvaC’ and some of the very early pieces, pre 1920, were not marked at all!

Post 1937,  SylvaC  began using a more distinctive back mark, which usually included the model number and, post 1938, the SylvaC brand name, thus making SylvaC pieces considerably easier to identify and value. The company also used foil and paper stickers with the SylvaC logo but these had a habit of falling off!

The brand name SylvaC is still in existence today, and some of the vintage pottery has started to be reproduced with similar backmarks.

 

I hope you have enjoyed my short overview of SylvaC pottery. You may not know the name but I am sure you will have seen some of these wonderful pieces!

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Posted on

Your ‘Must Have’ Vintage Radios!

1960s Roberts R200 Transistor Portable Radio

Your ‘Must Have’ Vintage Radios!

Why is there a revival in Retro Vintage Radios? And when I say vintage, I mean 20th Century!

Well, to be honest for me the answer is easy. Yes, you can have a tiny iPod, (which are very handy and a genius of technology and engineering, but I mislay mine constantly due to it’s size!), but you can’t really beat a vintage radio for both substance and style. There are so many to choose from and, yes, some of the most iconic names were actually ‘Made in Britain!’ Even more amazing!

2MT

On the 14th February 1922, Captain Peter Eckersley, a Marconi Engineer, broadcast the first wireless entertainment programme at 2MT,  Writtle, Chelmsford, Essex, UK.

2MT was the first British radio station to make regular entertainment broadcasts, and first in the world for regular wireless entertainment.

His regular announcement was “This is Two Emma Toc, Writtle testing, Writtle testing.”

Most of us will never have heard of 2MT, but its sister station, 2LO, which began transmitting from Marconi House on the Strand in London on 11th May 1922, led to the formation of the BBC.

Wireless radio entertainment had entered people’s home and was there to stay!

Style

1930s

Early battery powered radios were pretty huge, as they comprised electrical circuits composed of thermionic valves, and large capacitors and resistors.  Even non-portable radios were mostly powered by  a pair of rechargeable accumulators as many houses did not have a mains electrical supply.

This is a great photo from the 1930s of a young lady with her ‘portable’ radio!

 

There are some very pretty, and highly sought after, Bakelite  and wooden cased radios from the 1930s, as shown in the images below.

1940s

The late 1930s and 1940s also produced some very interesting designs! The brown bakelite and wood of the 1920s and early 30s makes way for the wonderful colours in Catalin, especially in America and Australia.   Chrome accents were popular and used extensively too. If you are lucky to find any of these radios in good condition, you will be parting with quite a lot of money!

1950s

It wasn’t until after WW2, and the advent of the transistor in 1947, did radio really take off. People had more expendable income, radios were seen as props in cult films and used by famous actors, and it was the era of ‘Rock and Roll.’ This all added up to the ‘baby boomers’ being desperate to try out new radio design and technology.

The radio manufacturers increased output throughout the World, particularly in the Far East, with the rise of the brands such as Sony and Sanyo in Japan. Many companies were falling over themselves to come up with better, cheaper or novelty items, as seen in the selection of images below!

The Regency TR-1 was the first portable transistor radio to be sold in 1954. It was the result of a collaboration between two companies: Texas Instruments, Dallas, Texas, and Industrial Development Engineering Associates (I.D.E.A.), Indianapolis, Indiana. It was quite small and could be held in the hand: I think the iPod has a similar look!

 

After the 1950s, the design and number of manufacturers of radios soared. That was until the 1980s, which saw the advent of the boom box radio, which you would hardly describe as portable, quickly followed by the introduction of DAB radio in 1997!

A selection of vintage radios 1960-1990

Then came the arrival of digital technology, DAB, and data streaming. It looked like the traditional radio had reached the end of its life but that wasn’t the case. Then came the ‘Revival’!

In 1990, a Martini advert featured the iconic Roberts R200 ‘Handbag’ radio. People clamoured to buy one, so much so that Roberts introduced a ‘Revival’ of their much loved radio but using the new DAB technology, with internals sourced from the Far East, and a much cheapened cabinet construction. These retro radios are still popular today but its more about the sound, the look and the history that keeps people interested!

I hope I have given you a flavour of ‘ Your Must Have Vintage Radios‘ and why I think there has been a rise in popularity of ‘retro’ radio. The images of the radios speak for themselves!

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave